I have been amazed as I grew up reading stories of inventors like Wright Brothers, Albert Einstein or Thomas Edison in last few hundred years working in their backyards or dingy offices conducting experiments to make things that changed the world. The same trend continues as we speak today, with young and passionate people who work in maker spaces, which is the modern equivalent of a garage startups, with its range of tools available to tinker with; whether with mechanical toys, electrical tools of past or multimedia tools available of the present and the future.

 

In today’s world, this spirit of tinkering is what takes certain countries to the forefront of innovation. So whether it comes to the largest market capitalization companies in the internet age like Apple, Facebook or Tesla, or the most industrial behemoths like SAP or Daimler or Bosch, they are all guided by a huge innovation streak, with some of them started in dorms or garages ending up making a big ‘dent in the universe’. So there is no doubt that tinkering has a huge value both from realizing our potential, or the “human ingenuity” and help lead a successful life by monetizing the benefits by “making things”. And this tinkering streak at its most intense in someone like Elon Musk may enable the next generation to visit Mars and make colonies there reality, beyond wildest dreams of most people. The spirit of experimenting, or “learning by doing” things rather than rote learning is also at the heart of IB philosophy.

 

With this background, I was mighty impressed when recently I attended a couple of Maker Saturday parents’ sessions. First was on Makey-makey boards, which are quite a sensation in electronics after the scientist duo Jay Silver and Eric Rosenbaum from MIT invented it to make playing with electronics easy. I helped make a guitar and thoroughly enjoyed the experience.

The second session was making multimedia movies with green screen where we saw creativity in young children flourish with production on the likes of Disney/Pixar animated movies.

By Sanjay Phadke, MBIS Parent.